Apple iPhone wins enterprise, is Microsoft relevant? – Computerworld Blogs

Fueled by the iPhone and iPad, Apple is in the enterprise — most recently becoming mobile device vendor of choice for one of Microsoft’s oldest enterprise allies, Lifetime Products.

via Apple iPhone wins enterprise, is Microsoft relevant? – Computerworld Blogs.

Another older link: Microsoft-centric shops using Apple for mobile. Microsoft v Apple for the enterprise mobile market will be a fascinating story for another couple of years, at least.

Tim Bajarin posted recently (again) about the prospect of Microsoft purchasing RIM.

I think he’s correct on most fronts: it seems like a natural fit and it probably won’t happen. However, I think Horace Dediu has persuaded me (Did Microsoft pay for the wrong Skype?) that despite the inherent advantages to both companies, such an acquisition would be less effective than Bajarin posits (also see Dediu’s Capital.bg | Nobody wants to buy RIM on this topic).

(I also wonder whether the centralized nature of RIM’s service offering has taken too many PR hits for Microsoft or anyone else to resuscitate the model.)

Another open question regarding Microsoft, Apple, et al in the enterprise: will there ever be another RIM or Microsoft in the enterprise space? Both carved out near-monopolies (RIM in mobile telephony/messaging, Microsoft in server software), and while Microsoft has managed to hang onto its hegemony, I’m inclined to think that in the mobile computing space at least there won’t be any one big winner. The consumer world is apparently happy with multiple standards, and I think the enterprise is (willingly or not) going to reflect that, both inside and among large companies.

 

Advertisements

Sign of the times

[RIM] said on Tuesday that it will launch its new Mobile Fusion device management software in the first quarter, allowing corporate IT staff to set and monitor rules for passwords, apps and software on a range of devices, including Apple’s iPad and iPhone, and smartphones using Google’s Android operating system.

via RIM to offer security features on iPhone, Androids | Reuters.

If you don’t read Asymco, I highly recommend doing so. Horace Dediu and Dirk Schmidt do an excellent job of piecing together the mobile industry numbers: sales, revenue, profit, market share, platform stickiness. Data analysis done carefully, thoughtfully, and in recognition of the limitations[*] of forecasting.

One clear trend emerging from Asymco’s analysis: RIM is in trouble. These days it’s hard to find anyone who will argue against that proposition, but when Horace first began beating the drum, it was a much more controversial assertion. Sales and profit were still growing, but the growth curves did not match the overall industry’s.

(more…)

Tech Trends and Disruptors to watch in 2012 | TechPinions

Instead, the [alternative] to the iPad that is really on their radar is Windows 8 for tablets, especially the version done for Intel processors. What they want is the ability to run Windows apps as is on a tablet even though they may actually write their own custom programs for Windows 8 and its Metro UI as well. But this is sort of comfort blanket to them and this Windows 8 tablet has many, especially hard-core Windows shops, waiting to see how good Windows 8 will be when it debuts in Oct of 2012 before making a final decision on what device/platform they will integrate into their IT programs over the next 5 years.

via Tech Trends and Disruptors to watch in 2012 | TechPinions.

Tim Bajarin captures very well what I see for the next year. From discussions with other engineers at MobileIron’s M1 conference this fall, and inferences from sales data from the analysts (disregarding their often odd spin), it’s clear that Android tablets are a non-entity in the enterprise, even in bring your own device environments. RIM hasn’t been able to make any headway with its sales pitch, despite its (admittedly waning) control over the enterprise phone market.

The iPad will see another year of dominance in the tablet space, and well beyond 2012 in the consumer arena, but companies will be sorely tempted to go with the much “safer” Microsoft solution.  Expect to see more in future posts about why Apple is still an uncomfortable fit in the enterprise.